01-Mar-2002All month
 
Lost Cities

Scores: Tel , Paul
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel , Paul
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel


05-Mar-2002All month
 
Carcassonne

This was a very strange game. Kev who was amazingly playing his first game of Carcassone seemed to be drawing all the city tiles he needed. Steve seemed intent on building the road to nowhere as he laid road tile after road tile. Tel finished a couple of small cities and roads early on but then got over ambitious trying to build a couple of monster cities, that never finished. Paul built a couple of early cities and roads then invested heavily in Farmers. But Andy had the strangest experience. Despite getting plenty of meeple on the board early on roads, cities and cloisters, he didnt score any points or get any men back until laying his very last tile when he completed a city. Kev had built a considerable lead as we went into the final scoring, but Pauls multitude of Farmers dragged him back and won him the game. Kev comfortably held onto second with Tel, Steve and Andy fairly closely bunched at the back.

Im a huge fan of Carcassone and play it whenever possible with whoever possible. However a two player game plays vastly different to a 5 player. Where the two player version has attack and counter attack, with lots of spoiler tactics, the 5 player sees players more interested in furthering their own cause rather than spoiling other players scoring chances. The game today was as usual highly rated with Kev in his first game giving a rating of 9/10

Final Scores
Paul 56, Kev 50, Tel 44, Steve 43, Andy 40

Ratings / 10
Paul 8, Kev 9, Tel 8, Steve 8, Andy 7
 
Scores: Paul 56, Kev 50, Tel 44, Steve 43, Andy 40
Ratings: Paul 8, Kev 9, Tel 8, Steve 8, Andy 7
Winner(s): Paul

Lost Cities

Scores: Paul 80, Tel 78
Ratings: Paul 7, Tel 7
Winner(s): Paul

Lost Cities

Scores: Paul 67, Tel 41
Ratings: Paul 7, Tel 7
Winner(s): Paul

Perudo

Scores: Paul , Andy , Tel
Ratings: Paul 7, Andy 7, Tel 7
Winner(s): Tel

Taj Mahal

Taj Mahal received awful scores from all of us the first time we played it, but over the 3 or 4 plays its had the ratings have steadily increased. The board is split into 12 territories, all of which contain room for 4 buildings. 1 of the territories also contains Agra allowing for a 5th building and this territory is the last to be played for. Tiles numbered 1-11 are then randomnly distributed amongst the first 11 territories with the 12 tile going to Agra. These tiles show the order that the territories will be resolved, they also contain 1 or 2 commodities that are used for scoring.

Each player starts with 6 cards. These cards contain 2 from 6 symbols Elephants, Vizier, and 4 different people. The cards are also coloured. Play goes clockwise round the table with each player having the choice of playing a card or dropping out. If they play a card it must match the colour of the cards they have already played this round. When a player decides to drop out they compare their cards with everyone still left in the auction. If they hold more of any of the 6 symbols then anyone else they have won influence in that spehere for this territory. The four people allow them to build a building on one of the 4 unoccupied sites it also wins them a token of that person, the Vizier allows them to build on any of the four sites even oif its occupied and the Elephants wins the tile and commodities on it. The 2 tokens of the same person are swapped at the end of that turn for a special card which the player can use once per territory while they hold the card.

There are 4 ways of scoring, whenever a player wins a commodity they score 1 point for each instance of that commodity they own. At the end of the turn when a player placed a building they score for any chain made. A chain is a unbroken collection of like coloured buildings along a road. It scores for the number of territories passed through minus 1. One of the special cards grants a 2 points whenever played. Some of the building sites contain bonus chits claimed by whoever builds there , these chits can either grant the player 2 points an extra card or be a commodity. Lastly, at the end of the game each player scores for the number of cards in his most common colour. **When a player builds in a territory they score 1 point for that territory however we discovered this after the game, so not suprisingly, for our group, we were playing the game wrong.**

Kev was at a disadvantage having never played the game before. Weve found that its takes at least half a game before the mechanism of the game becomes clear. Despite the rest of us having played the game before nobody was confident of knowing how to win the game. Steve got off to an early lead building a chain of buildings. By the 4th round Andy and Steve had the 4 special cards split between them. Paul was struggling, frequently withdrawing immeditaly for an extra card or having to drop out of auctions for no gain. Half way through the game he had only 1 building on the board. After a slow start, Andy was managing to get palaces on the board but couldnt manage to link them into chains. He did manage to pull off an inspired bluff at one point though, convincing Kev that he had a hand full of yellow cards after having actually played his last one. This netted him most of the goodies on offer that round. Steve maintained his lead throughout the game, due in part to him maintaining the +2 point special card for most of the game. Tel made a break from the pack in an attempt to catch Steve, by building a chain of his own and winning a couple of commodities along the way. Andy claimed the +4 point chit in Agra with Steve taking the elephants. This, and frequently playing a card to allow him to play the +2 card, had depleted Steves hand down to 2 cards of different colours hence only 1 point for the cards. Tel had 9 cards of the same colour bringing the scores to 40 to 39, Steve had managed to hang on by a single point. Paul scored 10 for the cards in his hand, more than doubling his score to 18, Andy also scored 18. Despite numerous calls of At least Im not last during the game, Kev finally came in last with 15.

When I first played Taj Mahal I hated it so much I only rated it a 3. But the game has grown on me. I still dont have much of a clue as to how to play the game properly, but at least I can now see what the game is about. The game played in 90 minutes with 5 of us, and with ratings of 8s all round everyone thoroughly enjoyed the experience.

Final Scores
Steve 40, Tel 39, Paul 18, Andy 18, Kev 15.

Ratings / 10
8s all round
 
Scores: Steve 40, Tel 39, Paul 18, Andy 18, Kev 15
Ratings: Steve 8, Tel 8, Paul 8, Andy 8, Kev 8
Winner(s): Steve


07-Mar-2002All month
 
Lost Cities

Scores: Paul 151, Tel 148
Ratings: Paul 8, Tel 8
Winner(s): Paul

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 135, Paul 82
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel


11-Mar-2002All month
 
Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 145, Paul 43
Ratings: Tel 7, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 136, Paul 112
Ratings: Tel 7, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel


12-Mar-2002All month
 
Dragon's Gold

The aim of Dragons Gold is to end the game with the most valuable horde of treasure claimed from killing dragons. The game starts with four dragons. Each dragon has a strength (5 - 10), a visible number of treasures and a hidden number of treasures. Each player has four characters they use to defeat the dragons. Each turn, he lays one character next to a dragon. Each character has a strength from 1-4, once there are characters with a combined strength larger than the dragons, it is dead. The hidden treasure is now produced, then all players involved in the killing have 1 minute to agree on how the treasure will be divided. If they cant agree the treasure is lost.

If a wizard is involved in the killing, and its players owner receives a red treasure then they also get a special power card (magic item). If a thief is involved in a killing then the owning player gets to randomly steal a treasure from any player involved in that killing, if there is a wizard and thief from the same player then that player gets to look and decide which treasure he wants to steal. The treasures score in different ways, some score per piece (red,gold,silver), others only if you have the most of that colour (blue,green,purple,white,yellow) or a set of colours. However, owning the black treasure at the end of the game renders this 2nd group worthless but is worth 15 points itself.

This was only our second playing of Dragons Gold and nearly a year since the first game. The group seemed to be in a very generous mood with no treasure being lost. Despite it being on the play screens most of us missed that there is a different distribution of the treasures, so no one batted an eyelid when Andy picked up 2 of the very rare white treasures early on. Because every dragon was divied up everyone was getting their fair share of treasures. Everyone seemed happy with the treasures to the extent that when the market came up and we got one minute of free trading - nobody used it. The Black diamond came up fairly late in the game but did come bundled with a few gold and silver tokens. Tel took the Black diamond and all the gold and silver that came with it.

In the final reckoning Andy had the majority in two colours, Paul and Boog in 1 each and Oggie having to make do with half a share of the fifth colour. The two colour majority only just won the game from Paul who tried to claim a win after miscounting.

The game seemed more fun this time around and although coming in at just under 90 mins seemed quite quick in playing.

Final Scores
Andy 42, Paul 41, Tel 39, Boog 37, Oggie 32

Ratings / 10
Andy 8, Paul 7, Tel 7, Boog 7, Oggie 7
 
Scores: Andy 42, Paul 41, Tel 39, Boog 37, Oggie 32
Ratings: Andy 8, Paul 7, Tel 7, Boog 7, Oggie 7
Winner(s): Andy

Formula Motor Racing

We ended the night with 2 races of the Knizia card game Formula Motor Racing. Each player has two cars in the race and plays cards to alter the order of the cars with the ultimate aim of winning the race. Unlike true motor racing the strategy (at least in our group) is not to try and hit the front too early. Players are looking to try and jockey for position to be in as strong a position as possible without looking like a threat and attracting the negative effect cards.

In the first game Paul managed this best, not taking the lead until the last card of the race. In the second race Oggie and Pauls first cars crashed out early, despite only having 1 car to concentrate on Oggie soon found himself at the rear of the pack. Desperate to reduce the field size he played a spin out card. He rolled the dice and rolled his own car, luckily for him he was allowed 1 re-roll which of course he used to roll the same number again. As Oggie trudged disconsolately back to the pits cheering on the non-player, the rest of us got down to the effort of trying to win the race. Oggie got some satisfaction in seeing the non-player win the race, but Paul finished high enough to secure the championship.

Final Scores
Paul 14, Boog 9, Tel 8, Andy 7, Oggie 2

Ratings / 10
Paul 7, Boog 7, Tel 7, Andy 7, Oggie 6
 
Scores: Paul 14, Tel 8, Boog 8, Andy 7, Oggie 2
Ratings: Paul 7, Tel 7, Boog 7, Andy 7, Oggie 6
Winner(s): Paul

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 96, Paul 61
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 142, Paul 73
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel

Metro

Another game that hadnt hit the table for a while. Players are building the Paris underground but with an agenda to try and ensure the longest routes start at their own stations.

The Boog declared before this game that although he enjoys the game he is hopeless at it. Andy started as he meant to continue by diverting a number of other peoples tracks for low scores. Oggie scored a reasonably big track early on so everyone made sure he didnt score too many more. Everyone started to catch up as their tracks were finished except the Boog who managed to keep his stations open. As we went into the last round of tile placement Boog was 20 points behind the next player and 30 behind the leader, but the tiles were kind to him and he scored 70 points from the last 5 tiles, to take the game in emphatic style, hopeless indeed.

We play Metro as a very light game that plays in about 30 minutes regardless of how many are playing.

Final Score
Boog 73, Tel 44, Oggie 43, Paul 40, Andy 33

Ratings / 10
Boog 7, Tel 8, Oggie 8, Paul 8, Andy 6
 
Scores: Boog 73, Tel 44, Oggie 43, Paul 40, Andy 33
Ratings: Boog 7, Tel 8, Oggie 8, Paul 8, Andy 6
Winner(s): Boog


15-Mar-2002All month
 
Lost Cities

Scores: Paul , Tel
Ratings: Paul 7, Tel 7
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Paul , Tel
Ratings: Paul 8, Tel 7
Winner(s): Paul


19-Mar-2002All month
 
Don

The evening started with a quick game of Don. The auction game where players are trying to amass cards of the same colour, but are not allowed to bid any numbers that end in a number they already own.

The game started with the first three auctions being won by different players. Steve and Boog had both won their second auctions before either Tel or Andy had bought anything. As the last auction came up the colours matched Boogs - if he could win this auction the game was his. Both he and Tel had a stack of cash in front of them. Boog started with a conservative 10 , Tel then bet the lot, all 24. Boog quickly counted his pile to find that he also had 24 so couldnt beat the bid. Tel had won, but only just because Andy had the majority of 4s he got all the winning bid,this gave him 2 extra VP to finish just a point behind Tel with Paul just one point back from Andy.

A gentle introduction in to the evening with a game that doesnt cause too many headaches but is good fun.

Final Scores
Tel 13, Andy 12, Paul 11, Boog 6, Steve 5

Ratings / 10
Tel 8, Andy 7, Paul 7, Boog 7, Steve 7
 
Scores: Tel 13, Andy 12, Paul 11, Boog 6, Steve 5
Ratings: Tel 8, Andy 7, Paul 7, Boog 7, Steve 7
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Paul 162, Tel 146
Ratings: Paul 8, Tel 8
Winner(s): Paul

Lost Cities

Scores: Paul 128, Tel 93
Ratings: Paul 8, Tel 7
Winner(s): Paul

Nicht die Bohn

We finished with one hand of Nicht de Bohn. A great little filler of a game that allows people to try to really screw up other players. Each of the 4 colours has the same 15 cards and at the end of the game a player scores for each colour. The numbered cards (1 - 10) score at face value, the zero card cancels this players score in this colour, the x2 card doubles the score and each -1 card multiplies the score by -1. Play starts in each round with the starting player playing a card face up. All the other players then simultaneously play a card. The starting player takes whichever card he wants apart from the starting card. The Player who played the card chosen, gets to choose next, and so forth. The last player gets the starting card and becomes the starting player for the next round.

The secret of winning this game in our group is to not score too heavily unless you can be certain that your scores cant be negatived or zeroed by the rest of the crowd. While everyone was busy trashing each others scores, Boog managed to quietly acquire a reasonable score spread over the 4 colours.

A fun game even for Tel who would have got a bigger score by not playing.

Final Scores
Boog 59, Paul 38, Andy 34, Steve 11, Tel -15

Ratings / 10
Boog 9, Paul 7, Andy 7, Steve 8, Tel 7
 
Scores: Boog 59, Paul 38, Andy 34, Steve 11, Tel -15
Ratings: Boog 9, Paul 7, Andy 7, Steve 8, Tel 7
Winner(s): Boog

Vinci

We then launched into the big game of the evening. Vinci is a civilisation building game that usually plays in between 90 mins and 2 hours. Each civilisation has 2 abilities, players expand their civilisations scoring points for the number of territories they control. Once they think a civilistion has outlived its usefulness they can put it into decline and choose a new civlisation to start. The abilities of the civilisations include giving more people, increasing attack or defense and scoring more points for certain territories. This was our first play with the 2nd edition rules. The cleaned up rules highlighted a few things wed been doing wrong.

From the initial setup of civilisation tiles there was a peach of a combo in postion 1. For the first time in as long as we can remember, Paul got a high dice roll to win the honour of going first. He took the strong combo and got off to a flyer. Steve went into decline after just one turn and with his second civ wiped Tel off the board forcing him into decline. Eventually Pauls civ drew too much attention and everyone turned on him and trashed his civ, but not before hed got himself over a third of the way to the target score of 100. Andy had acquired a civ with specialised fortification, this allowed him to quickly make each territory he owned more difficult to capture. He conquered the South West corner of the board with this combo. Since the fortification survived when the civ went into decline this area scored heavily for him. Andy looked certain to win, so the rest of the players trashed his civ. This allowed Steve to catch up. Hed been been alternating his civs in the North West and South East of the board.

The Score lay at Steve on 98 and Andy on 97. Andy was in decline so was able to come onto the board with a new civ, whilst Steves civ had been split up and suffering loss of cohesion. Andys new civ came on the board to score him 10 points. Steve now had 1 last turn to win the game. However his scattered civ was in disarray and the best he could do was to go into decline to score just 3 points. Boog managed a big score on his last turn, but not enough to drag him out of last place.

I thoroughly enjoy this game. Because every civ has different strengths each game is different, players have to employ different strategies during each game. Tonights game took 2 hours to play.

Final Scores
Andy 107, Steve 101, Tel 97, Paul 92, Boog 87

Ratings / 10
Andy 9, Steve 8, Tel 9, Paul 8, Boog 8
 
Scores: Andy 107, Steve 101, Tel 97, Paul 92, Boog 87
Ratings: Andy 9, Steve 8, Tel 9, Paul 8, Boog 8
Winner(s): Andy


24-Mar-2002All month
 
Medina

Our last game of the day was Medina. A clever game and again the product of last year’s trip to Essen where the aim is to rebuild the city of Medina. The point scoring system is varied with no obvious dominant strategy to winning the game. Each player can occupy each of four building types (one time only) and bonus points are awarded for building sections adjacent to the city walls and the meeple trail within. Bonus points are also awarded for having the largest building of each type, or by having the last building joined to one of the four corner towers via a wall section.

The final scores & ratings were:

Tel 49 (8/10), Paul 20 (8/10), Oggie 34 (7/10) and Andy 41 (8/10)
 
Scores: Tel 49, Andy 41, Oggie 34, Paul 20
Ratings: Tel 8, Andy 8, Oggie 7, Paul 8
Winner(s): Tel

Tenjo

Another new game and one that we had been waiting to play since purchased at Essen in 2001. Tenjo is a war game set in feudal Japan where players vie with each other to become Shogun. The game utilises a large game board and has some very high quality components. I should say before going any further that we are not experienced with games of this type so we spent a lot of time interpreting the rules. We also made a couple of mistakes when playing but just accepted the end result as it would have been too complicated to go back.

So where to start, this is a big ambitious game that promises a number of strategies with a fairly small number of rules. Each player starts with two castles, 3 family members (used to secure alliances with other players), two generals (or Diamyos), 100,000 Samurai, two shadow warriors worth 25,000 Samurai each – highly mobile reserve troops if you like, 25,000 money (Koku) and a number of element and ring cards (powerful cards used to manoeuvre troops, or affect combat by destroying generals/troops etc.).

Troops are manoeuvred around the board in an attempt to capture resource points, opponents’ castles, gain access to new provinces and of course destroy enemy troops. A 1D10 dice roll defines the number of moves and/or attacks you have available in any given turn (a turn is one month). Combat is again resolved using a dice role (1D20), but it is possible to weight the outcome in your favour by adding combat factors to the rolls. Troop losses could be harsh and at one point I managed to roll a 1 three times in succession much to my annoyance.

All of the castles are located around the edge of the board, so players can be spread apart initially. This did mean that it took several months before the first battle occurred as players were simply trying to gain position and hopefully also claim one or more of the 5 resource points in the middle of the board.

Occupying the resource points provided a regular monthly income (or additional Samurai). Failure to do this early on could mean that you would not have enough Koku to pay your castle maintenance at the end of the year (causing troops to desert/starve in proportion to the shortfall). However we found that combat over these was almost non-existent.

Every 12 months, there is an end of year sequence to run through. In truth we only achieved this once before ending the game. We had planned on playing the game for 1.5 hours but we had only completed the first 7 month of play by then, so we decided to end the game after 12 months (after 4 hours of play!!!).

We found that the Element/ring cards to be generally game altering in magnitude and cause several amusing moments during play. If anything they could be very harsh on the players and one player went from launching a devastating attack a castle to losing both his Diamyos (and as a result losing both his castles and all his wealth) in the space of a few minutes. The end of year event cards could also be just as harsh.

Generally it’s hard for us to assess the game overall, and a lot of the mechanics were compressed into the last few months (in fact 3 out of the 4 players became Ronin as a result of playing the element/ring cards). Timing would seem to be everything in Tenjo, attack too soon and you could lose a Diamyo or even a castle in the long run. All of us felt that the game was way too slow, but we also felt that we would give it another go since some of the mechanics were quite enjoyable.

Too much down time gave this game a low score in the end and everyone scored it 5/10. Final results were:

Tel 540,000, Paul 818,000, Oggie 642,000 and Andy 72,000
 
Scores: Paul 818000, Oggie 642000, Tel 540000, Andy 72000
Ratings: Paul 5, Oggie 5, Tel 5, Andy 5
Winner(s): Paul

Very Clever Pipe Game

This was the first game of the day to hit the table and also the first time it had been played by the group. Recently republished (we were playing the republished version), the game is a pipe-laying game but with a couple of variants both as a two or four player game.

We played the most complicated version of combined pipes and fields with each player choosing one of the following: black pipes, white pipes, light fields or dark fields. The mechanism for this is interesting with the each player being dealt nine cards, and then each player in turn openly chooses one of the four pipe/fields to go for. They then discard four of their nine cards (these were reshuffled into the draw pile). Of course the last player has no choice of what to go for but they still get to choose which cards to keep.

The cards are oblong in shape and are played into a ‘virtual’ grid either horizontally or vertically. The only rule for this is that when placing cards adjacent to each other that like colour pipes must be joined. At no time are you forced to lay cards next to each other but they must be placed in such a way that they could later be joined to other groups of cards.

Play proceeds in the usual way with each player placing a card into the grid in turn and drawing a replacement card from the draw pile. Once all the cards are drawn, play continues until all cards have been played. The aim of the game is to either:

Complete a pipe system in the chosen colour.
Enclose a field with the field of the opposite colour (pipes are ignored for this purpose and that orthogonal enclosure is the norm).

Completed pipes/fields are removed from the board and count as one point/card at the end of the game. The person with the most points wins. Because of how the cards are placed it’s possible to have a square enclosed by the cards. If this occurs then this is considered to be a pillar and counts as closure for pipes or as an enclosure for fields.

A very tactical game and one that typically appeals to us as by removing completed pipes/fields you can really upset your opponents’ plans. File scores/ratings were as follows:

Tel 14 (7/10)
Paul 7 (7/10)
Oggie 6 (4/10)
Andy 8 (7/10)
 
Scores: Tel 14, Andy 8, Paul 7, Oggie 4
Ratings: Tel 7, Andy 7, Paul 7, Oggie 6
Winner(s): Tel


26-Mar-2002All month
 
Euphrates & Tigris

Since there were four of us tonight it was the perfect opportunity to dust off E+T. This tremendous game does not get played anywhere near enough, mainly due to our one foray as a three player being a big disapointment, hence we only play this with four.

Each player is trying to amass influence along the banks of the rivers Tigris and Euphrates. There are 4 spheres of influence in the game represented by different colours and the winner is the player at the end of the game with the most complete sets of VPs ie 1 in each colour. Each player starts with a leader in each of the 4 colours and 6 random tiles. On their turn a player has two actions comprised of: playing a tile, playing/moving a leader, playing a catastrophe or exchange someof there tiles. Whenever a tile is played into a kingdom containing a leader of the same colour, the owner of the leader scores 1 VP in that colour. Whenever two leaders of the same colour are in the same kingdom a battle occurs resulting in one of the leaders being removed from the board. Battles are resolved by comparing influence on the board plus support made from a players 6 tile hand. The victor also gains victory points. If a tile is placed to produce four similar tiles in a square then these four tiles can be converted into a VP generating temple. There are 10 treasures scattered throughout the land when captured these are worth a VP in any colour. When there are only two of these left the game ends.

Paul, Tel and Steve each started in a corner of the board, with Andy setting up base in the middle of the board. Steve and Tel spent most of the game expanding their little kingdoms, not venturing too far from their respective first tiles, to the extent that Tels Black leader never moved after being the first piece he put on the board. Andy and Paul spent more time moving there Leader trying to exploit the board. Andy played an early catastrophe tile to prevent Paul building an early temple. Andy seemed to be winning many small skirmishes and picking up a lot of red VPs on the way. Pauls tactics seemed to backfire at one point when all his leaders were sat by the board waiting to get back on, without leaders on the board he couldnt score any VPs.

Into the endgame and Andy and Tel were both picking up plenty of VPs from temples but only in 3 colours. Steve put on a late surge grabbing a VP in each colour 2 turns running, while Paul seemed to be regularly picking up a single black but little else. Andy made a bid to end the game by joining Tels and Steves kingdoms together. Despite being favourite to win the battle, Tel let Steve take the win forcing the kingdoms to be re-split continuing the game. Tel then grabbed a couple of blues tokens ( his weakest colour) on his turn. Andy tried to finish the game again on his turn by again connecting the same two kingdoms, this time Tel won the battle to ensure the kingdoms remained connected and claiming the treasure that ended the game. The 2 blues on his last turn won Tel the game, Steve late surge had pulled him into second with Andy taking third.

Although the game took 2 hours to play the time seemed to fly by. The game does require plenty of thought to especially when decide the consequences of initiating battle. A very enjoyable game reflected in the marks given.

Final Scores
Tel 8, Steve 7, Andy 6, Paul 5

Ratings / 10
Tel 9, Steve 8, Andy 8, Paul 8
 
Scores: Tel 8, Steve 7, Andy 6, Paul 5
Ratings: Tel 9, Steve 8, Andy 8, Paul 8
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 87, Paul 65
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 8
Winner(s): Tel

Lost Cities

Scores: Tel 138, Paul 72
Ratings: Tel 8, Paul 7
Winner(s): Tel

Wyatt Earp

Finished the night with two hands of Wyatt Earp. One of the mystery rummy type games. There are 7 outlaws to be caught and pleyers play cards to either add capture points to that outlaw, or Sheriff cards which usually increase the value of the reward for an outlaw. At the end of the hand ( triggered by someone running out of cards) the capture points for each outlaw are totalled to determine if they were caught. If they are then the reward money is split between the players making significant contibutions towards the capture.

The game was not as vicious as our previous playing. One of the cards, Hideout, allows a player to cancel the effects of another player towards one outlaw. Throughout the two hands only one of the were successfully played and I think only 1 other was attempted to be played. Similarly a card was stolen from another player (via another Sheriff card) only twice. Steve appeared to have the monopoly on Wyatt Earp cards allowing him to regularly draw extra cards. Hence it was no surprise to find Steve leading after the first hand. Into the 2nd hand and this time it was Andy drawing the Wyatt Earps, however Steve got a kind draw with allowed him to finish the game quite early.

Steve stormed the game almost managing to double Pauls and Tels score who tied for second. We did play this slightly wrong (no surprise there) not playing the Wyatt Earp card to its full potential. The game played at about 15 mins a hand once wed go the rules sorted out.

Final Scores
Steve 17, Tel 9, Paul 9, Andy 7

Ratings / 10
Steve 7, Tel 7, Paul 7, Andy 6
 
Scores: Steve 17, Paul 9, Tel 9, Andy 7
Ratings: Steve 7, Paul 7, Tel 7, Andy 6
Winner(s): Steve